HUMBUG: A black mass carol?

casperwendystiles11As a boy, I remember having a book from the public school book sale about Caspar the friendly ghost and his friend, Wendy the witch.  To me, they were characters in a book until one day I began to ponder their true significance as I first entered my teen years. After all, the Bible stated that humans go to heaven or hell when they die, so I wondered who these ghosts or spirits could possibly be.  I then realized that since they haunt people that such ghosts could not possibly be angels.  That left just one other option.  I threw my book away.

Charles Dickens was born 1812.  He died in 1870.  During his lifetime, one of his most enduring legacies was the story “A Christmas Carol“.  Why did he love Christ so much? Or since he was a notable occultist, was it just Christ-Mass he loved?  If Christ-Mass was his love, why?

Satanic wheel of the year with the topmost Satanic sabbath of Yule celebrated by Catholics worldwide (and now Protestants as well) in the name of GOD.

Satanic wheel of the year with the topmost Satanic sabbath of Yule celebrated by Catholics worldwide (and now Protestants as well) and all in the name of GOD (i.e. Christ Mass).

Did you know that Christ-Mass was one of the eight sabbaths dear to witches around the world?  Did you know that the Roman Empire had used these same Baal holidays from Babylon, and had continued them as part of the pagan practices and superstitions which Rome glossed over with Christian names and meaning when the empire turned into the unholy Roman Catholic empire?  Such information can be read in numerous histories, but I also have written of these historical facts in my articles at this link, this linkthis linkthis linkthis linkthis link,this linkthis linkthis linkthis link, and this link. You can also watch the video at this link to see a modern-day version of the demon Krampus, one of the many names of the “elf” or “Black Peter” or helper of the Holly King (also known as Odin or Father Christ-mass or a variety of other names). Rome’s mixing of Paganism and Christianity together was one of the most unprecedented and ignominious legacies in world history. Literally, the world’s two oldest religions were combined ecumenically. Amazingly today, the Protestants who protested such practices also enjoy them.

The Satanic Wheel of the Year seen in the Vatican courtyard in front of St. Peter's Basilica.

The Satanic Wheel of the Year seen in the Vatican courtyard in front of St. Peter’s Basilica.

Charles Dickens’ primary religious focus was the occult or the hidden mysteries of Babylonian sun worship as seen in Baal worship and other successive variations of the religion in Egypt, Rome, Greece, Asia, Iran, Iraq, Scandinavia, and most of the world, although Dickens dabbled in a couple of Protestant denominations as well, namely Unitarianism and Anglicanism (an English variety of Catholicism recognizing the king as the ‘head of the church’ instead of the pope).  The beliefs of these two Protestant groups were a far cry from the beliefs of the Puritans and Pilgrims who believed that Jesus Christ was the Head and Chief Shepherd of the Body of Christ and who followed the Bible exclusively without any pagan additions or traditions.

A depiction of Dickens' ghost of Christ Mass future

A depiction of Dickens’ ghost of Christ Mass future

While Puritans in the New World did not tolerate occult practice, they, for the most part, were known for their love of others who had a different ethnicity and religion.  Was their tolerance and love for other neighboring people of diversity due in part to being mistreated in the Old World for their own beliefs by the Roman and Anglican powers that ruled?  It’s quite a study to read of the love that the Pilgrims and Puritans had for the native American Indians in Massachusetts as illustrated at Thanksgiving time, in contrast to the histories of the less tolerant Anglican colonies around Jamestown and Williamsburg or in even more abrupt contrast with the Catholic colonies who were known to enslave, rob, and kill the natives of the New World as seen in the article at this link.  Therefore, it is not at all shocking to learn that Dickens, known for his occult beliefs, was reported to be a Jew hater as seen in the article at this link.  Anti-Semitic hate is one of the characteristics of true Satanists as shown in the twelfth chapter of Book of the Revelation, and as seen in the history of various orders of their organizations and cults throughout history.   “A Christmas Carol” author, Charles Dickens, participated in demonic seances according to pages 582-583 of the Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology.

unquiet seance3

In this 2005 Doctor Who episode “The Unquiet Dead” from its first season, Charles Dickens is pictured as one of the participants in the seance scene, a fact that is taken from the reality of Dicken’s actual participation in such demonic practices throughout his life.

Why was Dickens so fascinated by ghosts and the dark supernatural realm? Why did the English author Dickens stereotype and ridicule the Puritans as being Scrooges? Is this any surprise when you realize Dickens was in the occult and the occult powers were not big fans of the Puritans.  In the 17th century, Puritans had taken away from England (and the early American colonies) one of the eight sacred sabbaths of witchcraft celebrated around the world. This particular celebration of Yule was especially cruel with the sacrifice of the Lord of Misrule at the end of the twelve day celebrations of orgiastic, pagan rites. Oftentimes, the Lord of Misrule was a Bible-believing Christian or Jew.

When you see what the occult Roman Empire used to do to Christians or when you read of what their protege, the unholy Roman Catholic religious system, did to Jews and Christians during such holidays, as well as during the Crusades, Inquisitions, and other horrors of the Dark Ages that extended into the 1800s, it should be no surprise that an occult follower like Dickens hated the Puritans.

members

The Ghost Club of London

As seen in the article at this link and in the article at this link, Charles Dickens was a member of the Satanic Ghost Club of London whose main focus was paranormal ghost activity or evil demonic spirits.  As one of the above articles in this paragraph states, the club was exclusive;

“Membership was small – 82 members over 54 years – and women were not allowed in the club, but during this period it attracted some of the most original and controversial minds in psychical research, serving almost as a place of refuge for those who were unable to pursue activities elsewhere.”

As noted in the same article, the club also included the sexually obsessed deviant Sigmund Freud, who was instrumental in turning the study of the soul (i.e. psyche) into a pseudo-science.  Also, included was the Jesuit graduate Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, author of the mystery series that featured the detective Sherlock Holmes. Both Doyle and his fictional character Sherlock Holmes were both interested in spiritualism.

seance1In the article “A Hankering after Ghosts: Charles Dickens and the Supernatural“, we further read of Dickens’ fascination with supernatural spirits.   Soumya Chakraborty, Ph.D. researcher, clearly spells out Dickens’ love for the supernatural in his scholastic article Dark Side of the Moon: Dickens and the Supernatural“.   Dickens was a mesmerist or hypnotist as seen in the encyclopedia article at this link, a role known by some as a charmer in the ancient world (a ‘charmer’ is mentioned within the fifth book of the Torah of the Bible in a list of witchcraft or Baal practice roles).  Charles Dickens is also listed as one of the notable English writers of occult literature in the Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology.  

The Puritans banned Christmas in England and also in the early half of the United States' existence as a nation.

The Puritans banned Christmas in England and also in the early half of the United States’ existence as a nation.

Thus, the three ghosts of the “mass of christ”, mentioned in Dickens’ work “A Christmas Carol”, appear to be demonic or familiar spirits who point Scrooge (a Puritan name) in the “right direction” toward the acceptance of Roman Catholic and occult Roman practice.  Ebenezer was a Jewish name as seen in the encyclopedia article at this link and Scrooge was taken by Dickens from a Puritan named “Scroggie” as seen in the article at this link. What irony that the Puritans and the Jews, who both despised Baal worship, were both represented in the name of Ebenezer Scrooge.  As previously mentioned, Dickens was said to be one who hated Jews and who despised Puritan thought, so was this just irony or simply a reflection of his intolerance for their refusal to celebrate the Yule season of sun worship?  Asia Times states in the article at this link:

“Scrooge is a vicious caricature of the Puritan position. Considering that America is the last Christian nation thanks in large measure to the accomplishments of the Puritans, we should reconsider Scrooge’s point of view.”

Louis de Wohl, author of the Encyclopedia of Occult and Parapsychology, was an astrologer for the British intelligence services known as MI-5. Louis De Wohl, also known as Ludwig von Wohl, was born in Berlin, Germany on January 24, 1903 and died in Lucerne, Switzerland on June 2, 1961.  He was a German-British Catholic author and astrologer who specialized in creating literary hagiographies of notable Roman Catholic Saints and different periods of the Bible, after an audience with Pope Pius XII where he was told to "write about the history and mission of the Church in the World." Louis de Wohl, right, an author of Roman Catholic novels about saints and the Bible, looks at a copy of his book, "The Citadel of God," with the Abbott of Ealing's Benedictine Abbey, Rev. Rupert Hall, in London in this March 21, 1960 file photo.

Louis de Wohl, author of the Encyclopedia of Occult and Parapsychology, was an astrologer for the British intelligence services known as MI-5. Louis De Wohl, also known as Ludwig von Wohl, was born in Berlin, Germany on January 24, 1903 and died in Lucerne, Switzerland on June 2, 1961. He was a German-British Catholic author and astrologer who specialized in creating literary hagiographies of notable Roman Catholic Saints and different periods of the Bible, after an audience with Pope Pius XII where he was told to “write about the history and mission of the Church in the World.” Louis de Wohl, right, an author of Roman Catholic novels about saints and the Bible, looks at a copy of his book, “The Citadel of God,” with the Abbott of Ealing’s Benedictine Abbey, Rev. Rupert Hall, in London in this March 21, 1960 file photo.

Louis De Wohl, in the fifth edition of the occult work “Encyclopedia of Occultism & Parapsychology“, states on page 558:

“Le Fanu wrote several short stories on supernatural themes, ‘‘Green Tea’’ being one of the most outstanding, but his Gothic masterpiece was undoubtedly the longer
story ‘‘Carmilla,’’ in which he developed the vampire theme. It is a story of a female vampire, with a strong suggestion of lesbian love, set in a dreamlike landscape in an old castle in Styria, a region in Austria. ‘‘Carmilla,’’ first published in 1871, was read by another Irishman, Bram Stoker, when he was a young part-time drama critic in Dublin. It was to stay in his mind for 25 years before he wove the vampire theme into his own masterpiece, Dracula, first published 1897. Stoker’s novel has since had a lasting influence on stories, plays, and movies all over the world. Other nineteenth-century British writers of notable occult fiction include James Hogg (1770–1835), Frederick Marryat (1792–1848), Bulwer Lytton (1803–1873), Charles Dickens (1812–1870), William Morris (1836–1896), and Robert Louis Stevenson (1850–1894).”

De Wohl, in his “Encyclopedia of Occultism & Parapsychology” further states on pages 414 and 415:

1878 marley ghost1“The great novelist Charles Dickens, born on February 7, 1812, had a keen interest in the supernatural, … Dickens had a special interest in mesmerism or animal magnetism [or demonic activity], through his friendship with John Elliotson. In 1838 Dickens witnessed a demonstration by Elliotson of the ‘‘mighty curative powers of animal magnetism.’’  During his tour in Italy in 1844, Dickens became acquainted with the family of Emile de la Rue, a Swiss banker residing in Genoa. Dickens actually practiced mesmerism on Madame de la Rue as a treatment for her neurasthenic disorders [known as white magic], even experimenting with treatment at a distance. On one such occasion, while he was concentrating on sending this force over a distance, his wife, Catherine, seated nearby, fell into a ‘‘mesmeric trance,’’ her senses numbed and her extremities cold. When Dickens awakened her, she said she had been ‘‘magnetized.’’  Dickens’s interest of in such occult subjects was often masked by his popular writings in a jocular vein. In 1848 he practiced mesmerism on the artist John Leech, who had suffered from a severe fall. Afterward, Dickens wrote to John Forster with the jocular comment, ‘‘What do you think of my setting up in the magnetic line with a large brass plate? ‘Terms twenty-five guineas per nap.’’’

In other words, Dickens was joking in the final sentence that he might charge twenty-five guineas (an English form of currency) for each client he induced into a hypnotic trance through his powers as an occult wizard.

seanceIn summary, Dickens was a man of witchcraft, seances, demonic spirits, a mesmerizer of people into hypnotic trance, and the member of an exclusive club that saturated itself in demonic activity.  He is the same one who wrote “A Christmas Carol” which many Christians today of the more conservative Puritan theological school of thought find to be “good stuff”, and who endorse and celebrate his works through dramas in their religious organizations and institutes, and who even fight over having Christ-Mass in public events (which they once abhorred as a Catholic mixture of the holy and profane).

Is this irony of situation or just plain ignorance on the part of a population that now knows less and less about its past and more and more about fictional entertainment that streams to them continuously through a voluminous number of channels via cable television, motion pictures, tablets, cell phones, radio stations, satellite networks, and more?

Other sources of interest regarding Charles Dickens:

  • Fairbanks, K. ‘‘Le Cas Spirite de Dickens.’’ Arch. de Psychol.
  • T.I. (June 1892).
  • Jacobson, Wendy S. The Companion to ‘‘The Mystery of Edwin
  • Drood.’’ London: Allen & Unwin, 1986.
  • Kaplan, Fred. Dickens and Mesmerism: The Hidden Springs of
  • Fiction. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1975.
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